Staying hydrated and drinking enough water has always been of the utmost importance. Drinking the right amount of water keeps your body working properly and functioning the way it should, but does it get even more important the older you get?

Read on as our team at AFC Urgent Care Gastonia sheds some light on the importance of drinking water as you age.

Do I Have a Greater Risk of Being Dehydrated As I Get Older?

The short answer is yes. The longer answer is that as you begin to age, your desire for water diminishes. So even when your body is thirsty for water, you might not realize it because of your lessened sense of thirst.

Experts say that they still don’t really know what causes the lack of sense of thirst, but they are sure of its consequences. Dehydration is common in the hospitalization of seniors for this very reason, and drinking lots of water is already more important for the elderly because their bodies have less water in them compared to children and younger adults.

Signs of Dehydration

  • Decreased amounts of urine
  • Increased fatigue and sluggishness
  • Confusion
  • Dizziness
  • Heart palpitations

What’s the Best Way to Stay Hydrated?

Most experts recommend drinking eight eight-ounce glasses of water per day. That’s a good rule of thumb, but that rule fluctuates a little bit depending on your daily activities, if it’s hot outside, and if your body’s metabolism is higher than normal.

Also, we all know that drinking water all day long every day can get pretty boring, so try getting a little creative. Throwing in some fruit juices, sparkling waters and milk throughout the day is OK as long as it’s done in moderation. Some fruits are also very hydrating and lower in sugar than fruit juices, so eating oranges and watermelon is another great way to add water to your diet.

Benefits of water

  • Increases energy
  • Can help relieve constipation
  • Can help and prevent headaches

Feeling dehydrated or in need of a checkup? Visit us at AFC Urgent Care Gastonia today!